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Publications and Students

Never Again — Fulfilling a Promise By Anna Duke

The International Human Rights Law Clinic’s blog series The Matter of Human Rights continues with this third installment by third-year-law-student Anna Duke. In her piece “Never Again – Fulfilling a Promise,” Duke discusses the crime of genocide, established at the Genocide Convention in 1945, as an example of how the history of international law has manifested as a struggle between aspiration and political will. Duke references past instances of genocide and analyzes the language of the Convention to argue that public pressure can generate political will and overcome limitations of legal definitions.

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Publications and Students

The Foundation of Human Rights: Is “Enough” Really Enough? by Joseph Nunn

Yesterday marked the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. With it, the International Human Rights Clinic brings the second installment of its blog series The Matter of Human Rights: “The Foundation of Human Rights: Is “Enough” Really Enough?” Joseph Nunn, a third year student at the law school, critically examines the promises of the Universal Declaration as they have been realized in practice.

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Announcements, Faculty, and Publications

The Long Term: Resisting Life Sentences, Working Toward Freedom, a new anthology coedited by Alice Kim

Director of Human Rights Practice Alice Kim is coeditor of and contributor to a new book illustrating the devastation caused by an unjust prison system. Kim is the inaugural director of the new Human Rights Lab, a project of the Pozen Center, that is engaging students and community in human rights work addressing mass incarceration and racialized policing.

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Announcements and Publications

Trump’s executive order builds on history of racist immigration policies - Editorial by Executive Director Susan Gzesh

This administration launched its anti-Muslim executive order and other policy initiatives against immigrants based on racism, arrogance, over-reaching and scare tactics. The public outcry and preliminary legal success were not what the White House anticipated. Some executive orders or new laws may succeed in reinstating racialized unfair immigration policies, but the opposition will defeat others. The immigrants, asylum seekers, their allies and lawyers are acting with a deep understanding of the struggle for civil rights and human rights that precedes this latest offense to morality, justice and common decency. They have only just begun to fight.

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